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I have two gardens, one I tend and the other that teaches me. I was not born to this dragon_mayfly_place but another – 500 miles south along this Atlantic coast. I have, for 30 years, made this Maine place my home and it has taught me to know it and myself. I will always have an ache for the place of my ancestors, but these rivers that tumble to the Gulf of Maine and this glacial land have claimed me.

 

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Germination

findedges2x“The very earth itself is a granary.”  HDT

Page 102 – I took in February three tablespoonfuls of mud from three different points, beneath water, on the edge of a little pond : this mud when dried weighed only 6^ ounces; I kept it covered up in my study for six months, pulling up and counting each plant as it grew ; the plants were of many kinds, and were altogether 537 in number; and yet the viscid mud was all contained in a breakfast cup!‎  Darwin

 

 

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Habitat

I sifted through my travels from Spring until Mid-Summer 2017 choosing those images that might give a feel for habitat: sun to shade, wet to dry, rich to lean, before canopy leaves emerge or after.

Local Plants

***Observations: The Language of these Fields

A man is worth most to himself and to others, whether as an observer, or poet, or neighbor, or friend, where he is most himself, most contented and at home. There his life is the most intense and he loses the fewest moments. Familiar and surrounding objects are the best symbols and illustrations of his life… The poet has made the best roots in his native soil of any man, and is the hardest to transplant. The man who is often thinking that it is better to be somewhere else than where he is excommunicates himself. If a man is rich and strong anywhere, it must be on his native soil. Here I have been these forty years learning the language of these fields that I may the better express myself.

Henry David Thoreau, November 20, 1857

“It is natural to look upon with a kind of supernatural reverence; even ecologists admit  how little we know about plant interaction within communities.”

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