Plant Life

These are printed on 8×10 285gsm cotton rag paper.

  • Hobblebush

Winterberry

There is a moment in the late fall when the winterberries shine. then the birds swoop in and stuff themselves with the fruit. By Thanksgiving the bushes are stripped bare.

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wild grapes

Along the river upstream is a path where there is a hodgepodge of plants both invasives and natives. Here I found a large plot of wild grape.

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Red Oak Marcescence

Marcescence Some deciduous trees exhibit a trait known as marcescence. This is when leaves senesce and wither, yet are retained on the tree until late winter or early spring. The best known marcescent species are American beech and various oaks. It’s been hypothesized that the leaf retention helps to limit herbivory of developing buds. Hidden by shriveled foliage, they are less likely to be seen and consumed by deer and other mammalian herbivores. Since this trait is primarily seen in young trees or on the lower branches of mature individuals (these branches are particularly prone to browsing by wildlife) this is a strong theory. Others have suggested that it gives trees an edge in early spring. Fallen leaves have a nifty ability to act as thermal conduits by absorbing heat from the sun. Anyone who has walked through the woods or on a frozen pond during the winter has undoubtedly noticed leaves sunken into the snow and ice. If enough of these land atop accumulations at the base of the tree they may allow the sap to begin flowing slightly earlier—even a single day would be advantageous in an evolutionary sense. Mike Adamovic, Native Plants of the Northeast

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Queen Anne’s Lace Naturalized

Daucus carota, whose common names include wild carrot, bird’s nest, bishop’s lace, and Queen Anne’s lace (North America), is a white, flowering plant in the family Apiaceae, native to temperate regions of Europe and southwest Asia, and naturalized to North America and Australia. This beneficial weed can be used as a companion plant to crops. Like most members of the umbellifer family, it attracts wasps to its small flowers in its native land; however, where it has been introduced, it attracts very few wasps. Wikapedia

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Nannyberry

There is this very special place on the back side of Ward Hill where a brook has become a wetland having been dammed up some years time ago which has resulted is a complex grove of native plants and roadside volunteers. I call it my berry place. Viburnums, elderberry, sumac, winterberry. To name a few.

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Hobblebush

I have a favorite native shrub, the hobblebush, and a favorite native genus of shrubs, the viburnums. Come spring I am out looking for the first sign of hobblebush in bloom. It is the first understory shrub I identify on the edge of the woods. It is called “hobblebush” because it travels by layering branches on the ground and sprouting nearby. The branches trip you up as you walk through a grove of them.

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Virgin’s Bower

The wild clematis is special. It is one of the few plants especially vines that is actually native in Maine as well as in Maryland where I was born. It grows extravagantly.

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buttonbush

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Buttonbush two

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Queen Anne’s Lace Befreo Unfolding

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Buttonbush in abstract

The late end of fall and only a few of the buttons are left.

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