Home Birds

Trends during recent years have shown many southern species moving further north due to climate change. Your grandmother grew up not seeing cardinals or titmice in Maine as these species have only taken up residence during the last 50 years. 

Northern Flicker

Do not see them on our feeders often. This moment felt so intimate. They are so large and beautifully feathered.

$12.50

Tufted Titmouse

Most recently known as native farther South, with the warming of Coastal New England the titmouses come to be in residence, now overwintering along with the chickadees and nuthatches, and nesting in the summer. The brood has definitely grown. Last summer there were two hatchings complete with flying and feeding lessons.

$12.50

Pine Warbler

This beautiful bird showed up fall a year ago after a storm. He was probably headed south when he got off course. He spent a few days at the feeder and then off he went.

$12.50

Baltimore Oriole

Some years we are lucky enough to have a pair nesting nearby and they are around most of the summer. A treat to see.

$12.50

Tufted Titmouse Two

$12.50

Two Slate Colored Juncos

$12.50

One Slate Colored Junco

$12.50

Nuthatch

$12.50

Pine Warbler

$12.50

Hairy Woodpecker

We have hairy woodpeckers year round. I often hear them after dark tapping on the house.

$12.50

Pine Grosbeak female

Sometimes earlier but usually in late winter they arrive en masse and descend on the old crabapple next to the house. For a time the tree is covered with them and then they are gone.

$12.50

Male Cardinal

For years I would only see they down the hill, first at the bottom and then part way up. Now they are regularly here. Usually one pair later with offspring.

$12.50

One more Pine Warbler

$12.50